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  • Armor and Ballistic Plate

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    Principal Design Features
    Magnesium is the primary alloying agent in the 5083 series and is one of the most effective and widely used alloying elements for aluminum. Alloys in this series possess moderate to high strength characteristics, as well as good weldablilityand resistance to corrosion in the marine environment. Because of this, aluminum-magnesium alloys are widely used in building and construction, storage tanks, pressure vessels and marine applications. Examples of common alloy applications include: 5052 in electronics, 5083/5086 in marine applications, anodized 5005 sheet for architectural applications and 5182 makes the aluminum beverage can lid. The U.S. military’sBradleyFightingVehicleis made with5083and the 7xxx series aluminum.

  • Defense

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    Carbon Steel is a steel with carbon content up to 2.1% by weight. The definition of carbon steel from the American Iron & Steel Institute (AISI) states:

    Steel is considered to be carbon steel when:

    No minimum content is specified or required for chromium, cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, niobium, titanium, tungsten, vanadium or zirconium, or any other element to be added to obtain a desired alloying effect;

    The specified minimum for copper does not exceed 0.40 percent;

    Or the maximum content specified for any of the following elements does not exceed the percentages noted: manganese 1.65, silicon 0.60, copper 0.60.

    The term "carbon steel" may also be used in reference to steel which is not stainless steel; in this use carbon steel may include alloy steels.

    As the carbon percentage content rises, steel has the ability to become harder and stronger through heat treating; however, it becomes less ductile. Regardless of the heat treatment, a higher carbon content reduces weldability. In carbon steels, the higher carbon content lowers the melting point.